logo

How To Answer Stupid Interview Questions – And What They Really Mean

How To Answer Stupid Interview Questions

In my career as a headhunter, I have conducted approx 2,500 job interviews myself and assisted to hundreds my clients led with my candidates.

Since 2001, I have learned a lot from my clients on clever questioning that brings out the best of the candidates.

But I have also heard many stupid interview questions.

What is the reason stupid interview questions are asked after all?

And how should you answer them?

In my opinion, there are two reasons why interviewers ask stupid questions during the job interview:

  1. Because the interviewer really does not know it better or
  2. Because the interviewer is insecure

 

Maybe in the end, both come back to the insecurity thing anyway: maybe not the only one who is stressed. Or inexperienced regarding job interviews. I remember very well a situation ten years ago where I had a search assignment and presented my candidates to the CFO saying “I suggest you interview my three candidates and then we discuss”. He answered “right, but how should I do that?”.

Stupid questions can be as obvious as “how many paper clips fit into this room?” or “if you were an animal, which one and why?” They can be more subtle such as “where do you see yourself in 5 years?”, “what is your biggest weakness?” or “how do your colleagues/ friends/ cashier at your local grocery store describe you?”. I mean, hey, who would really give true answer? In my entire career, I have never heard anyone saying “Oh right, there is one more thing you should know about me: I am a notorious liar, I hate my job and prefer gossiping and as a consequence of all that, I am far below average compared to my peers!” 

What is the purpose of these questions?

Does the interviewer have the right answer how many paper clips fit into the conference room? Will you be disqualified if your answer is 10% away from the truth? Does s/he really expect to talk about your dark side, I mean, about the REALLY bad parts of your character?

Of course not. In most cases they just want to see how you react.

So what is the best reaction to this kind of answer?

Before saying anything, ask yourself “what is the purpose of this question?”. In many cases, it is something different than what the interviewer said.

Let’s translate interview language to English. Here come some examples:

  • The question “What is your biggest weakness?” means in reality “I know it already: You talk far too much. However, I wonder if you have a realistic perception yourself, so fire away!”
  • “Where do you see yourself in 5 years?” means “Of course no one knows. In times like these, we do not even know where we are in 6 months. Maybe I have won in the lottery and left this stupid company or extra-terrestrians have taken over the world. Let’s see if you are naive and over-ambitious or down-to-earth and realistic.” 
  • “Imagine you are standing in front of a house on fire. On the second floor is a pregnant woman, on the third one your mother in law and on the fourth one your boss. Who do you save first?” can mean either “I am enjoying this tremendously and really think you are good. Here comes the final test” or “I just lost my mind and will jump out of the window as soon as this interview is over.”


Conclusion:

There is a saying that goes “There are no stupid questions, only stupid answers”. I do not agree: there are extremely silly questions, especially in job interviews. If you want to know how to answer them, first ask yourself “why this question?” and then reply.

There is the art and the science of the job interview (HERE is more on the topic on this blog); don’t let the interviewer get carried away and become too artistic during the job interview though…

Jorg Stegemann
Jorg Stegemann - Headhunter, Certified Coach and Business Writer - is the CEO of Kennedy Executive Search. Apart from running Kennedy's company blog, he writes for Forbes, BBC and other media.
  1. Pascal Reply

    Congratulations: as always a down-to-earth practical advice.
    I would like to add that silly questions may come from the interviewer not being prepared. Especially when you are talking to HR persons with a wide range of tasks in a big company he/she might not know what the job is specifically about. Then you may want to help this interviewer to understand so that he/she can present his choice of candidates to his constituency with more credibility.

Leave a Reply

*